In 1939, several trains with Jewish children left Prague, which was already occupied by the Germans. Trains headed to England, where the children survived the war. For most of them, it was a life-saving journey – their parents and other relatives were mostly sent to concentration camps and died in gas chambers. Winton’s trains rescued 669 Jewish children. The last train with a record number of 251 children did not leave – it was to depart on September 1. Unfortunately, World War II broke out and the Germans did not allow the train to leave. Of these children, only five survived the war.

Nicholas Winton was silent about his act for many decades – the truth was discovered by his wife Greta, who in 1988 found documents about her husband’s heroic act on the loft of their house. Nicholas Winton remarked succinctly at the time: “The children needed help, and I was able to provide it to them.”

At Prague`s Main Station, there is a sculpture dedicated to Nicholas Winton and the rescued children. However, when you walk around the Fanta’s café to the first platform with the sculpture, you can see another sculpture on the lower floor. That is a sculpture of the parents of Winton’s children. The journey of the children into the uncertainty also needed a lot of courage and decisiveness of their parents – there was no war yet, people didn`t know anything about the concentration camps and the Holocaust as the Final Solution to the Jewish Question (Endlösung der Judenfrage) and its 5.9 million of Jewish victims…